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Underride truck crashes often result in catastrophic injuries

On Behalf of | Dec 7, 2021 | Catastrophic Injuries |

Commercial trucking accidents can occur in many ways, most of them placing the passengers of smaller vehicles in extreme danger. However, some commercial vehicle accidents are typically more severe than others. Underride truck accidents, for example, are responsible for some of the most horrific victim injuries.

As its name suggests, underrides occur when a smaller vehicle slides (rides) beneath the underside of a tractor-trailer in a crash situation. These crashes usually occur along the sides and rear of the truck trailer. They can also happen in the front of a tractor-trailer if it does not stop in time to avoid striking the vehicle in front.

Two catastrophic ways underride accidents injure victims

Unfortunately, many underride truck accidents result in the death of the victim. Those that survive can suffer a range of injuries. Below, we will discuss two catastrophic forms of harm arising from an underride accident:

  • Traumatic brain injury. When a passenger vehicle enters the underside of a truck, the victim’s head usually aligns with the vehicle frame. As you might imagine, this can lead to horrific head and brain trauma that can impact the victim for the rest of their life.
  • Spinal cord damage. Injuries to the spinal cord also occur in underride crashes when the truck strikes the upper portion of the victim’s body. Sometimes, victims may recover from spinal cord injuries to a degree, but in most cases, such trauma leads to lifelong disabilities like paralysis.

It is critical to act after a Pearisburg, West Virginia (or Daniel Island, South Carolina) underride accident injures you or a loved one, or if a death occurs. You will need financial compensation after your ordeal, but that is not the only reason to consider a legal remedy

When people turn to the law for answers and help, the government may finally take the need for improved protection seriously.